5 Guidelines for Choosing a Hypnotherapist

During my book writing years, people would email me from time to time about how to find a good hypnotherapist or hypnotist to work with for looking at extraterrestrial encounters, investigate missing time, or even to look at past lives. This underscored to me the need to have this skill to offer and I’m now certified in hypnosis. But what about people who don’t live near enough to me, or to any other hypnotherapists who are “safe” to explore memories with that might just land someplace way outside of “accepted reality”?

First of all, be sure you really want to explore your memories or missing time. It can be like opening Pandora’s Box, and it can’t really be successfully closed again. If you have memories of extraterrestrial experiences or military abductions or other-dimensional experiences, it will take you time to process and integrate such experiences. There can be much turmoil emotionally, even post-traumatic stress, as you work through this. If you are working with me, I strongly suggest continued body-centered sessions to help deal with what you’ve discovered. Even if you’ve had your session with someone else, if they are not available to help you integrate what you discover, then consider working with me or someone else you feel can truly help you. In the old days, there were what I call hit-and-run hypnosis sessions – a session would happen with a hypnotist (rather than a hypnotherapist) and then off that hypnotist would go, leaving their client with a lot of strange and/or frightening material to try and sift through and make sense of on their own.

I will be doing some limited sessions via Skype for a while to see how they go and if this is a good, viable way to work with people at a distance. My guidelines on this are firm: prospective clients must have a trusted person present with them to handle Skype and technical aspects of the session while they are exploring their memories. The other equally important aspect of this is to watch over the person being hypnotized and provide a sense of safety. “Trusted person” would mean some friend you trust completely and who you would seek out to talk about your experiences under hypnosis anyway.

But what about those who are not able to do a session via Skype for some reason? What is the best way to find help to explore your memories and experiences? Following are some suggestions.

1) Finding the right hypnotherapist/hypnotist.

If you can, find out if a possible hypnotherapist works with people who have had ET encounters, and has experience with this, and experience with ET encounters is important! In looking for a hypnotherapist, try any spiritual circles of friends or places where people gather who you feel good about. Let them know you are looking for someone, and, as much as you are comfortable with in opening up to your circle of friends or the spiritual gathering, tell them why you are looking, and ask what they know about any prospective hypnosis practitioner. If they help you find someone, then you can apply the discernment process I’ve outlined below. If you don’t have this kind of circle of support, try the yellow pages or do some internet searches for hypnosis.

2) Prepare yourself to meet and talk with a prospective hypnotherapist or hypnotist.

Before meeting and talking with them, calm and quiet any emotional or mental activity going on in you. Mental activity to quiet down: worry thoughts, racing thoughts, anxiety thoughts. Emotional activity: emotions you feel caused by the above thoughts that could be causing any emotional-body reactions, such as faster heartbeat or breathing, any tightness or sensation of contraction in the throat, chest or stomach area. Too much mental or emotional activity can jam your intuitive radar. Basically, you want a calm, quiet and centered demeanor when meeting and talking to them the first time, at least as much as possible. Then your intuitive radar can function more properly. You will be able to trust your intuition more when perceiving from this calm, centered state. If thinking and emotions come up, gently tell them you will give them time to be thought/felt later, when you are alone. Once you’ve prepared yourself by calming and centering, talk with the prospective hypnotherapist on the phone or in person (again, before agreeing to or arriving to do a session!) carefully pay attention to how you feel in your body while talking with them.

3) Take some time to yourself to assess how you felt in talking with the prospective hypnotherapist or hypnotist.

Once you’ve had this initial talk with the prospective hypnotherapist, take some time to assess how you felt in their presence from the calm centeredness, as much as you were able to cultivate and maintain. How did the discussion and information “land” in your body? In a body-mind state of calm centeredness of possible perception, what came up for you, in the mind or the body? As much as possible, perceive the spontaneously arising thoughts, emotions or body sensations that come up in meeting the hypnotherapist without too much second-guessing or dissecting with logic. I have learned to pay attention to feelings that constitute “YES” or “NO” in my body, and I believe you can also. One is yielding, relaxed and may have happiness with it, the other is resisting and has a closed, contracted feeling in the body, with mental thoughts of concern and a feeling of hesitancy.

4) Choose someone who will support YOU in working with you, not someone with a personal bias to support their own research, opinions or beliefs.

In talking with them, find out their own feelings about the kinds of experiences you want to explore, or their feelings about abductions or contacts or other strange experiences, such as military or covert ops abductions. What is their approach? If they have any set beliefs or ideas about abductions as being bad and invasive, steer clear of them. Even if your experiences feel bad or invasive to you, the last thing you need is someone who will commiserate with that or try to look for and draw out all the information supportive to such beliefs about experiences. It could make things worse for you in the long run and keep you from discovering everything about your experiences, including the gifts of your experiences that come from integrating them into your life and new expanded world view.

Mary Rodwell, a friend and hypnotherapist from Australia, has sought in her work to simply bring forth people’s experiences through gentle questioning without applying any of her own belief systems, preconceptions or prejudices to what she and her clients uncover in sessions. Because of this, she has taken her clients – including myself – to some remarkable places of understanding and insight with regard to their experiences, and it comes far more from we the clients for ourselves than from her.

5) Trust is essential to going under hypnosis.

Pay attention to your feelings and perceptions. It’s vital that you select someone to work with you feel good about. In investigating extraordinary experiences that fall outside our normal daily reality, there is enough that can be strange, otherworldly, other-dimensional, disturbing, upsetting or downright frightening. You don’t need to feel you can’t truly trust the hypnotherapist on top of all that. He or she should be a guide for you that you can fully trust.

When all is said and done, pay attention to your intuitional feelings and how they land or register in your body. Thoughts and emotions will flow from these intuitional feelings, but don’t go off into too many logical thought processes. If you feel the “YES” or “NO” in your body, trust it, and either work with the person who inspires the “YES” or move on from the person who inspires the “NO” and look further, and apply the same assessment and discernment process to the next prospective hypnotherapist or hypnotist.

I hope this post is helpful. If you have questions, I will be watching the comments section under this post and will do my best to address any questions in a follow up post or video. Watch for future posts, audio or video logs about opening to our tel-empathy and expanded senses, and discussing the concepts of resonance, dissonance and discernment.

Namaste,

Niara